Part 5: Trafficking a big problem in Baltimore but charges almost always dropped

Capital News Service; Photo Illustration by Alexis Jenkins Former Baltimore firefighter Jamar Marvin Simmons and co-defendant Franklin Roosevelt Coit recruited women — many “unusually vulnerable,” federal prosecutors said — from as far away as Texas and South Dakota and made them work as prostitutes at this warehouse at 208 S. Pulaski St.

Capital News Service; Photo Illustration by Alexis Jenkins

Former Baltimore firefighter Jamar Marvin Simmons and co-defendant Franklin Roosevelt Coit recruited women — many “unusually vulnerable,” federal prosecutors said — from as far away as Texas and South Dakota and made them work as prostitutes at this warehouse at 208 S. Pulaski St.

August 5, 2015

By Capital News Service

By Jon Banister

Baltimore has become a hub for human trafficking because of its interstate highways and proximity to major airports, city and state officials say. But few human traffickers are arrested, and even fewer are convicted -- while police continue to make hundreds of prostitution arrests every year.

City police have made approximately 800 prostitution arrests a year on average, according to a Capital News Service analysis of FBI data from 2008 to 2012, the most recent statistics available. But Baltimore has charged only 10 suspects with sex trafficking since January 2013, a CNS review of court records showed. And prosecutors dropped all charges in eight of the cases...