Human Trafficking Survivors Share 5 Ways To Help End Practice

No. 1: Ensure Law Enforcement Is Trained In Anti-Trafficking

10/18/2016 11:00 am ET | Updated 6 hours ago
Sarah Ruiz-Grossman
Associate Editor, The Huffington Post

A new report is ensuring human trafficking survivors’ voices are heard.

LISA KRISTINE Tina Frundt, report co-author, sex trafficking survivor, and founder of nonprofit Courtney’s House

LISA KRISTINE
Tina Frundt, report co-author, sex trafficking survivor, and founder of nonprofit Courtney’s House

On Tuesday, the U.S. government released its first-ever report on human trafficking written by survivors.

In the document, 11 survivors of sex and labor trafficking, who were appointed by President Obama to the first U.S. Advisory Council on Human Trafficking in 2015, provide recommendations on how to improve federal trafficking policies ― ranging from legislation to public awareness campaigns to victims’ services.

The U.S. is the first country in the world to produce such a report, according to the State Department.

“For the first time in the history, we [survivors] will be able to help,” Tina Frundt, report co-author and sex trafficking survivor, told The Huffington Post. “To be quite honest, the laws that were passing didn’t have too much to do with what we really needed ― our voices were being lost.”...